Pvp要素の生かし方


#1

今以上にpvp要素を強くする予定はありますか?
特定の資源や施設などを巡って競争する要素も面白いと思います。
競争の中で力をつける文明と衰退する文明がある方が生きる事に貪欲になる筈です。
拠点間の距離が遠すぎる為にpvp要素が生きる事があまりありせんし、あったとしても立場の弱い赤子や女性をターゲットする一方的な殺戮くらいです。
もちろん農場を運営したり、狩りに出たり、子供の世話をするのも楽しいですよ。


#2

Can someone provide an English translation?


#3

I don’t know much but apparently he says that do this game plans to strengthen the (player vs player ) characteristic or not?
He says that it is fun to fight to collect limited resources and use infrastructure. The winner village will continue to develop and the loser village will lose due to greed. Apparently since village are far from each other , there is no need to fight for resource. Even if there is , most probably a weak eve will be spawn near the village .
Hmmmm, he is right in someway. I do like to find abandoned village sometimes but hmm, if village is spawned too near , the village will probably suffer from lack of steel and so on .


#4

PvP is rather limited in this game as simply a way for griefers to be disposed of, or as it may be, for griefers to dispose of you. In theory if there was a way of better connecting different settlements then wars might ensue, particularly if more advanced weapons were created which would be more expansive but with less combat stress. I think planes are the key for such connectivity since they would allow two cities to exchange players despite being many thousands of lifetime’s travel away. There still wouldn’t be much sense in fighting for resources but maybe in future updates there will be some rather advanced technology worth fighting for. Two cities might develop planes and basic navigation, but one might be much better at it than another and might also have loads more tech so if one civ started getting plucky against a more advanced one they could be quickly stopped. All this points towards having more industrialised ways of getting iron and maybe a better means of organisation. Like a printing press that immediately turns a branch or even firewood into paper and perhaps a way of making books so that people could write down more complicated things.